Last updated February 1, 2012.

The Drupal.org infrastructure can provide optimized test instances for temporary use (e.g. a few hours) when the regular PIFR/testbot infrastructure is not appropriate. A typical use case is for security releases which are kept private until a Security Advisory with security fixes is made available publicly.

These instances are built following the regular testbot setup instuctions and come with a Drupal 6 PIFR client, a Drupal 7 checkout and Drush 3.3. Contact Randy Fay if you need such instance. Make sure to have your ssh key available in your Drupal.org profile or elsewhere so you can be granted SSH access to the server. These are the steps to get Drupal 7 running for testing purposes.

- Connect to the server with ssh root@ec2-x-x-x-x.compute-1.amazonaws.com
- You can log into the PIFR web interface at http://ec2-x-x-x-x.compute-1.amazonaws.com/ with admin/drupaltesting1
- You might want to skip the PIFR client entirely and just run the test from Drupal 7 directly. Go to http://ec2-x-x-x-x.compute-1.amazonaws.com/admin/pifr/run-test, this will automatically configure the environment and clone Drupal 7 in /var/lib/drupaltestbot/checkout
- Disable PIFR's cron by commenting out the cron job in /etc/cron.d/drupaltestbot (this is to avoid running cron on the PIFR client which kills any custom test run).
- Install Drupal 7 by browsing to http://ec2-x-x-x-x.compute-1.amazonaws.com/checkout/install.php, db=drupaltestbotmysql, user=root, no password
- Apply any additional patches you would like to test (e.g. security patches)
- Type git init to turn the code into a local git repository. Take note of the path, which you'll need in the next section.
- Enter the URL to the local git repo (something like file://localhost/var/tmp/drupal/.git) to the Git repository as the "Drupal core repository URL: *" at admin/pifr/configuration.
- Run the tests from the command line in /var/lib/drupaltestbot/checkout: sudo -u www-data php ./scripts/run-tests.sh --url http://ec2-x-x-x-x.compute-1.amazonaws.com/checkout/ --php /usr/bin/php --color --concurrency 8 --all. At the time of the release of Drupal 7.2, they take about 23 minutes on an 8 CPU instance.
- when you are done with the server, don't forget to halt it and let Randy know so he can shutdown the instance (and avoid paying for unused resources).